Freshman keeps positive attitude after surviving childhood cancer

Freshman Delaney McBryde survived cancer at age two. Her mother cut her hair after it began falling out as a side effect of treatment. Delaney now gets her hair cut and donates to the children who also have cancer.

Freshman Delaney McBryde survived cancer at age two. Her mother cut her hair after it began falling out as a side effect of treatment. Delaney now gets her hair cut and donates to the children who also have cancer.

Nastassia Carter, Reporter

Every year 15,780 children are diagnosed with cancer. Nearly 2,000 die from it and 80 percent of children diagnosed with cancer before age 20 years survive at least five years. Cancer is rare in young children. Treatments include chemotherapy and radiation.

Freshman Delaney McBryde was diagnosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (A.L.L) at the age of two.

“I remember one night she would go to sleep she would just be lying there, and every time I looked at her I could tell that something just wasn’t right,” her mother Dusty said. “So I told my husband something wasn’t right and that we needed to take her to the hospital.”

Delaney ended up going to the hospital that night, and the doctors told Dusty that she had cancer and that if they had waited another day to take her to the hospital she could’ve died.

“The hardest part about having cancer is having the IV on me and being in the hospital and being sick constantly,” Delaney said.

They lived in Premont, Texas, at the time. She went to Driscoll Children’s Hospital in Corpus Christi. The doctors treated the cancer with chemotherapy and radiation shots. Delaney’s least favorite part was having to get shots with very long needles.

“I remember I had always done her hair before all the cancer had happened, then all of sudden her hair was falling out and I couldn’t stand to look at her like that so I had cut her hair,” Dusty said.

Delaney feels happy and relieved that the cancer gone, but at the same time she is worried that it could come back, especially since at this age it is easier for the cancer to come back.

“Even though I had cancer it never stopped me from achieving my dreams,” Delaney said. “Live life to the fullest, because there’s no promise of tomorrow.”