A Total Eclipse of the Heart

Spanish+teacher%2C+Lisa+Hutchinson+enjoys+the+view+of+the+partial+solar+eclipse+using+eclipse+glasses+purchased+by+Paula+Rodriguez%2C+a+Bastrop+High+School+counselor.+Hutchinson+is+accompanied+by+many+teachers+and+students%2C+excited+about+the+partial+totality+of+the+solar+eclipse.+
Spanish teacher, Lisa Hutchinson enjoys the view of the partial solar eclipse using eclipse glasses purchased by Paula Rodriguez, a Bastrop High School counselor. Hutchinson is accompanied by many teachers and students, excited about the partial totality of the solar eclipse.

Spanish teacher, Lisa Hutchinson enjoys the view of the partial solar eclipse using eclipse glasses purchased by Paula Rodriguez, a Bastrop High School counselor. Hutchinson is accompanied by many teachers and students, excited about the partial totality of the solar eclipse.

Spanish teacher, Lisa Hutchinson enjoys the view of the partial solar eclipse using eclipse glasses purchased by Paula Rodriguez, a Bastrop High School counselor. Hutchinson is accompanied by many teachers and students, excited about the partial totality of the solar eclipse.

Makayla Bryant, Entertainment Editor

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For the first time in the U.S. since 1979, a total solar eclipse darkened the skies across the country from Oregon to South Carolina. Luckily, Texas had the privilege to enjoy the partial eclipse, and enjoy it we did. Hopefully in April of 2024, we will be able to bask in the awe of the next total solar eclipse to come.

“The eclipse blew me away.” Paula Rodriguez, one of the Bastrop High School counselors said. “I was flabbergasted, in awe.”

A solar eclipse happens when the moon aligns with the sun and covers it completely. It lasts for

approximately three hours, blocking most every inch of sunlight depending on where it is viewed from. Unfortunately for this eclipse, it only lasted about three minutes.

“It’s surprising how the moon seemed to move in a million different directions, yet it only kept its path,” Rodriguez said.

Everybody has heard the media news and many, many jokes about protecting your eyes from the solar eclipse, except during totality. But in all honesty looking at an eclipse without any eye protection can severely hurt or even permanently damage your eyes.

“I loved using the glasses.” Christine Rector, another one of the Bastrop high school counselors said. “It was amazing how you could clearly see the moon and its movements.”

The solar eclipse begins when the sun is partially blocked by the moon, which can last for over an hour. The crescent sun then converges into a “diamond” shape of sunlight where the last bit of the sun’s luminous disk and the faint corona shines along the edge of the moon creating a “ring”. In the last glorious moments before totality, the “diamond ring” will break up into tiny beads know as Baily’s beads. The moon finally completely covers the sun in what is called totality, lasting for only about a minute in some locations. The moon continues to move on its course eventually, exposing our magnificent sun once again.

“Everything about reality had flipped.” Spanish teacher Lisa Hutchinson said. “The sun had ultimately became the moon.”

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Makayla Bryant, Entertainment Editor

Junior Makayla Bryant is the Entertainment Editor for the Bear Facts for a second year and on the varsity golf team. Makayla is thinking about attending...

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A Total Eclipse of the Heart